Youth and anger, interlude

There were times in my youth when boys and sometimes grown men, who were older, taller and bigger and stronger than me, would wag their tongues in such a way that I’d get offended.

Because I was just a young buck, and didn’t know better, I’d wait til the character was walking away and then come out of hiding and say something that I immediately regretted. I’d say it because I was angry, not because I thought it through.

Well more than half the time, the hooligans who said such to anger me would hear what I said, turn around and address me. They’d say something intimidating like, “What you say?”

Not planning for their retaliation, I’d be taken aback and would clam up or cower. But on some occasions I’d still be bristling. The fighting, however, was always the same, always a loss.

Part of growing up is to develop that emotional shell. So that when someone says something offensive, but otherwise harmless, it bounces right off.

The other part of growing up is to deal with the wounds from the words and actions that found their way past that tough exterior.

Forgiveness goes a long way. It’s the modern way to “turn the other cheek” when someone slaps you.

–from a 1998 interview with famed actor Gilford “Whiskers” Allsworth-Dinnersmith, who most recently has made an autobiographical work.

In it Mr. Allsworth-Dinnersmith talks about his childhood, his early career as a stuntman, and how he got discovered to become the famous playwright he is today.

Doom, interlude

Made from aluminum foil and green sticky notes. Three sticky notes to be exact. Exactness would be needed and possibly demanded, if Marvel’s Victor Von Doom had any idea his likeness was constructed as a simple miniature.

–from Don Fritz “The Sticky Note” Thomas-Wheatgrass, illustrator and origami enthusiast, from an online interview, August 2015.

Rainy Wednesday, interlude

I’ve had a cold since at least Saturday, starting with a frog in my throat, and have been fighting the symptoms with vitamin C.

A slice of lemon and honey in green tea have been my constant friends, when I can remember them.

Yesterday was my last day to volunteer for the Tennessee Republican Party. I had a cold, but chose to go anyway.

At the store I bought a non-drowsy cold medicine, but still had to deal with brain fog.

The day went by rather fast with little problem, other than my bladder giving me a hard time.

Bladder has been intimate friends with my nerves since I started volunteering back in September.

The young man who is more or less in charge of volunteers will go back to his home in Colorado on Thursday, since Midterms are over.

I was supposed to help by phone banking until California until 11 p.m. e.s.t. but it didn’t happen.

—from an interview with Ctfarc Isaacson on November 7, 2018.

Busy, interlude

I’m busy on Mondays and weekends since volunteering has taken up those days that used to be my free time, used for writing/ watching shows via computer.

Tuesday has become reserved for baking Cheesecake for Wednesday.

It seems Thursday is the only real time I have to write my novel, which has taken a back seat for activities that supposedly are more important and will get me a job.

–from an interview with an anonymous author about the struggles of writing and real life.

Recorded February 14, 1988.

Up late, interlude

Live from Chattanooga, TN, it’s “Up Late with Tiger-do!” Featuring everyone’s favorite spoiled, obnoxious house cat who thinks he’s a night owl, Tiger-do-kitty!

–the writer for the show was fired a day later, as it turns out Tiger-do peed on his shoes an hour before the show went on air.

Air date June 6, 2009, Orange Kirkland Studio Productions Inc.

Two-Toned, interlude

..Culinary fighters from all over the world, here for the prize above all others. A single recipe that could change the world, it’s fate in the hands of a single chef.

..Carbohydrates, when heated turn to gold, it’s a fight just for the bold. Every body get ready, it’s time to win the perfect bread. Before it’s over, I’ll be the champ when you’re defeated.

All ingredients assembled, utensils clean and calibrated…

“T-t-time to get kneaded.”

..For the pursuit of the swirl, for the pursuit of the swirl…

Competition is the answer when talk is cheap and there’s too many chefs—in the kitchen.

For the pursuit of the swirl…pursuit of the swirl.

–from Super Awesome Bread: Battle for a Better Slice! the Musical. Written and directed by Arugula Jersey-Taft, 1989, New York, NY.

Lyrics from the introduction song, “Pursuit of the Swirl,” lyrics written by J. B. Dandelion-Bradford.

The theatre production was a huge success, until producer Arugula Jackson-Taft heard about it and promptly sued for production rights, in 1990, claiming she came up with something similar a year earlier.